Vindiciae Gallicae: Defense of the French Revolution and Its English Admirers

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Página 326 - Lords Spiritual and Temporal and Commons do in the name of all the people aforesaid most humbly and faithfully submit themselves, their heirs and posterities for ever...
Página 123 - It is vain for the arrogance of learning to condemn the people to ignorance by reprobating superficial knowledge. The people cannot be profound ; but the truths which regulate the moral and political relations of man, are at no great distance from the surface. The great works in which discoveries are contained cannot be read by the people ; but their substance passes through a variety of minute and circuitous channels to the shop and the hamlet.
Página 231 - For he who freely magnifies what hath been nobly done, and fears not to declare as freely what might be done better, gives ye the best covenant of his fidelity; and that his loyalest affection and his hope waits on your proceedings.
Página 109 - Assembly seized the moment of eradicating the corruptions and abuses which afflicted their country. Their reform was total, that it might be commensurate with the evil : and no part of it was delayed, because to spare an abuse at such a period was to consecrate it...
Página 314 - Regni, in which the principles of popular politics, and the maxims of a free government, are delivered with a precision, and enforced with an energy, which no former age had equalled, and no succeeding one has surpassed.
Página 130 - Thefe fafts evince that the powers pf mankind have been unjuftly depreciated, the difficulty of Political affairs artfully magnified, and that there exifts a quantity of talent latent among men, which ever rifes to the level of the great occafions that call it forth. But the predominance of the profeffion of the law, that profeffion which teaches men *' to augur mif-government at a diftance, and *• muff the approach of tyranny in every " tainted breeze,"* was the fatal fource from \vhich, if we...
Página 350 - Britain should issue as a gift of her bounty and beneficence, rather than as claims recovered against a struggling litigant ; or, at least, that if your beneficence obtained no credit in your concessions, yet that they should appear the salutary provisions of your wisdom and foresight, not as things wrung from you with your blood by the cruel gripe of a rigid necessity.
Página 125 - Whatever be the ultimate fate of the French Revolutionists, the friends of freedom must ever consider them as the authors of the greatest attempt that has hitherto been made in the cause of man. They never can cease to rejoice, that in the long catalogue of calamities and crimes which blacken human annals, the year -1789 presents one spot on which the eye of humanity may with complacence...
Página 115 - Governments that now exist in the world (except the United States of America} have been fortuitously formed. They are the produce of chance, not the work of art. They have been altered, impaired, improved, and destroyed, by accidental circumstances, beyond the foresight or controul of wisdom. Their parts, thrown up against present emergencies, formed no systematic whole.
Página 107 - ... succeeds.* The gradual reform that arises from the presiding principle exhibited in the specious theory of Mr. Burke, is belied by the experience of all ages. Whatever excellence, whatever freedom is discoverable in governments, has been infused into them by the shock of a revolution ; and their subsequent progress has been only the accumulation of abuse.

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