Social Capital: Critical Perspectives

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Stephen Baron, John Field, Tom Schuller
OUP Oxford, 2000 M11 30 - 320 páginas
The idea of social capital is increasingly prominent in international, national, and local policy-making and in the social sciences. However, its rapid rise to prominence has not been matched by proper scrutiny of the idea and its consequences. This book provides the first full critical analysis of social capital, written by authors from a wide range of disciplinary and policy backgrounds. The book asks searching questions: Is the concept of social capital really new? Does it offer significant anaytic purchase? Can it be an operational, as opposed to rhetorica concept? Can policies based on social capital deal with conflict and social exclusion? These issues are explored through studies of education, health, political science, urban regeneartion, economic development and other areas and disciplines. The authors - who include academics, professionals and policy specialists - are all distinguished and prominent contributors in their own fields.
 

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read page 188 s.capital in health

Contenido

Civil Society and Democratic Renewal
39
Social Capital the Economy and Education in Historical
56
Economics Social Capital and the Colonization of the Social
78
Identity the Transition to Work
94
Social Capital Innovation and Competitiveness
111
Are Refugees Social Capitalists?
124
Social Capital Trumping Class and Cultural Capital?
142
Social Capital Schools and Exclusions
168
Contextualizing Health Promotion
182
Making it Work on the Ground
197
Social Capital and Associational Life
212
Human Capital Social Capital and Collective Intelligence
226
Social Capital and Human Capital Revisited
243
References
264
Index
293
Derechos de autor

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Pasajes populares

Página 4 - Social capital is the aggregate of the actual or potential resources which are linked to possession of a durable network of more or less institutionalized relationships of mutual acquaintance and recognition...
Página 9 - I mean features of social life - networks, norms, and trust - that enable participants to act together more effectively to pursue shared objectives.

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Acerca del autor (2000)

Stephen Baron, University of Glasgow, Scotland John Field, University of Warwick, England Tom Schuller, Birkbeck College, University of London

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