Reappraising Jane Duncan: Sexuality, Race and Colonialism in the My Friends Novels

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McFarland, Feb 28, 2017 - 196 páginas
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Scottish novelist Jane Duncan's semiautobiographical My Friends series was dismissed by postwar critics as lightweight, at a time when a coterie of "angry young men" monopolized the attention of the British publishing establishment. Yet deeper themes are at play in the 19 novels. Modern readers will recognize feminist motifs, a wide-ranging examination of women's education and work in the 20th century, a woman's view of the rising societal tensions of the 1920s and 1930s, and an outsider's perspective on the racial divide in the soon-to-be-independent West Indies.

This book explores Duncan's body of work, out of print for decades, though sought by loyal fans. Her characters run the gamut--drunken tinkers, Lowland housewives, Irish miners, members of the London fast set and English marchionesses, all portrayed with telling detail. Her novels--two of them recently reprinted for a new generation--reveal a charming and perceptive recorder of the changes Great Britain underwent in the past century.

 

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Contenido

Preface
1
A Note on Language
3
Jane Duncan The Writer and Her Work
5
Guides to the Novels
117
Major Characters
171
Scots Vocabulary
176
Works Cited
181
Index
185
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Acerca del autor (2017)

Rita Elizabeth Rippetoe is an independent scholar of genre fiction, with an emphasis on detective fiction. She has written on a variety of subjects, including the works of John le Carre, Dorothy Sayers, and William Faulkner. She lives in Orangevale, California.

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